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History

We believe that history is a subject through which pupils can understand, enjoy and appreciate the world in which we live. We believe that the teaching of fun, engaging lessons that bring history to life is instrumental in helping children to enjoy learning and thus become life-long learners. This fundamental belief means that we pride ourselves on delivering a high-quality education which helps pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world.

We appreciate the value of enquiry based learning and therefore have designed our curriculum so that history lessons foster opportunities for children to be inspired and ask questions why. Pupils construct informed responses to their own questions that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. This involves taking children through significant periods in history from the Stone Age to World War II. The alignment of the history curriculum with the English curriculum (where possible) ensures that children are immersed fully in their topics. Often, a pupil's author of the term, or a book on which a series of English lessons are focussed, provide the foundations on which children develop their understanding of a historical topic. Through utilisation of a variety of teaching and learning styles, pupils are motivated to enquire, weigh evidence, sift arguments and think critically as they focus on recent eras of history, significant individuals and ancient civilisations from all around the world.

We have identified four key skills areas which we believe children require to become effective historians. These are chronological understanding, vocabulary, historical knowledge and questioning. These key skills are made up of a number of expectations, which progress in difficulty through the year groups.

 

Year 1

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Answering questions based on an artefact or picture
  • Identifying objects from the past
  • Recognising that some people in history have made our lives better today
  • Ordering up to three events in chronological order
  • Explaining how we have changed since we were born

 

  • Identifying objects from the past
  • Asking and answering questions about old and new objects
  • Identifying the difference between old and new objects
  • Using measurements of time such as old, new and long time ago

 

  • Identifying objects from the past and explaining what it was used for
  • Recognising that we celebrate certain events because of what happened in the past
  • Becoming aware that stories and objects belong to the past
  • Spotting old and new things in a picture

 

 

Year 2

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • To use the words ‘past’ and ‘present.’
  • Develop their sense of chronological order and consider why the great fire happened, its results and the different way it was represented using historical sources.
  • Recognise that their own lives are different from the lives of people in the past.
  • Identify aspects of the past beyond living memory.
  • Ask and answer questions about significant events and individuals. 
  • Explore an event that has been commemorated for nearly 100 years. 
  • Investigate the origins of Remembrance Day and how its significance has grown.

 

 

  • Learning about where the people and the events studied fit within a chronological framework and use words in relation to the passing of time.
  • Understanding some of the ways in which we find out about the past.
  • Learning why we remember Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole and will compare and contrast different ways of life.

 

 

Year 3

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • The Late Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages and how their farming methods, religion, tribal kingdoms and art changed over time.
  • We will be looking at the history of our own area.
  • Finding evidence in historical documents.

 

Kings and Queens:

  • We will develop an awareness if the past, knowing where people and events studied fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods in the context of finding out about the connection with present-day society.
  • To develop our knowledge of the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements in the context of learning about, and placing onto a timeline some significant British monarchs since 1066.
  • To explore the life of Richard III and evaluate the evidence as well as differing perspectives.  

 

  • The Romans.
  • Julius Caesar’s Empire and the invasion of Britain.
  • Boudica’s resistance and the Romanisation of Britain; its influence and the reasons for its downfall.

 

 

 

Year 4

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Through studying the Anglo-Saxon, we will:

  • Develop an understanding of grouping periods of time in history into decades and centuries.
  • Explain that events from the past have helped shape our lives.
  • Appreciate that artefacts from the past are helping us build an accurate picture of people’s lives in history.
  • Know people in the past cooked, travelled and worshipped differently than we do.

 

 

Through our topic of ‘France’ we will learn about key events in the French Revolution.

  • Developing an appreciation that war is a historical constant and that they are often associated with religion, invasion and empire building.
  • Use artefacts from the past to help build an accurate picture of people’s lives in history.
  • Plot recent history on a timeline using centuries.
  • Compare two versions of the same historical events from different points of view.

 

We will learn about Ancient Egypt through the following skills:

  • Place periods of history on a timeline showing periods of time.
  • Develop an appreciation that war is a historical constant. I know that they are often associated with religion, invasion and empire building.
  • Research the life of a child in history.
  • Know people in the past cooked, travelled and worshipped differently than we do.
  • Appreciate that artefacts from the past are helping us build an accurate picture of people’s lives in history.
  • Compare two versions of the same historical events.
  • Give more than one reason to support a historical argument.
  • Explain that events from the past have helped shape our lives.

 

 

Year 5

Autumn

Spring

Summer

We will further developing our skills to use primary and secondary sources and artefacts to determine if sources are reliable or not. We will be doing this while learning about the Normans.

 

  • Understand the order of things because I know that the past can be divided into different periods of time.
  • Understand important events, people and changes of different periods.
  • Give reasons for the main events and reasons for the changes.
  • Pick out different ways that the past is shown.

 

 

The Victorians.

 

  • Understand the order of things because I know that the past can be divided into different periods of time.
  • Understand important events, people and changes of different periods.
  • Give reasons for the main events and reasons for the changes.
  • Pick out different ways that the past is shown.
  • Draw a timeline showing different time periods and different information i.e. when famous people lived.

Understand that crime and punishment have changed over the years.

The Mayans.

  • Make comparisons between historical periods, explaining what has changed and what has remained the same.
  • Draw a timeline showing different time periods and different information i.e. when groups of people lived.
  • Use mathematical skills to work out exact timescales.
  • Test out a hypothesis in order to answer questions.

 

 

Year 6

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Understand the importance of Black History and World War One.
  • Find out and place events, people into correct periods of time.
  • Recognise the role of importance figures in Black History, such as Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King JR. 
  • Use dates and vocabulary to describe the passing of time.
  • Know about cultural diversity.
  • Identify and describe reasons for historical events.
  • Make links between the main events and changes within periods.
  • Ask and answer questions. 
  • Select and record information relevant to the focus from a variety of sources.
  • Communicate knowledge and understanding of history.
  • Recognise the impact of propaganda.

 

  • Understand why World War Two broke out.
  • Realise the impact The Blitz had on people.
  • Know why children were evacuated and what impact this had on them.
  • Appreciate the hardship and the need for rationing of food and clothes.
  • Interpret a range of sources, including primary and secondary.
  • Recognise that the past is represented and interpreted in different ways.
  • Give reasons for differences between time periods.

 

  • Recognise similarities and differences between different periods of history.
  • Give reasons for differences between ages.
  • Recognise the impact Greek culture had on the world.
  • Know the reasons why citizens and slaves were different.
  • Appreciate the difference in games and leisure.
  • Know some plays and understand the importance of theatre.
  • Study the significance of soldiers and warfare.
  • Know some beliefs and customs.
  • Know Gods, Goddesses, myths and legends associated with the Greeks.

 

 

 

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