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Geography

Geography is a subject that is packed with excitement and wonder. It helps children gain a better understanding of our world’s people, places and environments, and the interactions between them. Geography helps children to understand how and why places are changing, and to better imagine, predict and work towards what the future may hold. Underpinning all of this is strong spatial awareness that deepens our understanding of what places are like, why and how they are connected.

This vision of geography is what our geography curriculum at St Thomas’ is built around. Through our carefully tailored curriculum, children will develop into explorers. We aim to excite children about the possibilities of what the world has in store for them to explore and experience. Children should leave the school with a sense of their place in the world, both culturally and physically, and a desire to enquire into the world around them.

At St Thomas’, the National Curriculum objectives are split into overarching topics. Geography plays a varying role with some topics heavily focused on Geography, such as ‘Destinations to the wider world’ in Year 2 which focuses on the oceans and continents with a focus on Australia, and other topics where it has a more of a cross-curricular role, such as Ancient Egypt in Year 4. The Geography curriculum is designed to offer breadth and depth in both knowledge and skills. We feel this best prepares children for their future learning. However, a key driver in developing the Geography curriculum was also enjoyment.

 

Year 1

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Using observational skills to study the geography of the school and its grounds
  • Using maps to locate where I live in the local area
  • Identifying daily weather patterns in the UK
  • Using simple compass directions

 

  • Identifying daily weather patterns in the UK
  • Using observational skills and asking and responding to questions
  • Describing and locating cold areas of the world in relation to the North and South Poles

 

  • Learning the physical and human features of the seaside and understanding the geographical similarities and differences
  • Using basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical and human features
  • Naming and identifying characteristics of the four countries and capitals of the UK and surrounding seas
  • Naming and locating the world’s seven continents and five oceans

 

 

Year 2

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Use maps and atlases to support their learning, identify and label the continents, oceans, countries, capital cities and the surrounding seas. 
  • Understand basic geographical specific vocabulary relating to human geography.
  • Research famous landmarks and their locations. 
  • Explore the designs of these landmarks and their purpose.
  • Discover the similarities and differences through studying human and physical features of the UK.

 

  • Name and locate 7 continents and five oceans, recognising where they are located in relation to one another.
  • Use maps, atlases and globes to pinpoint these places on maps and in atlases.
  • Use aerial photographs.
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and of a small area in a contrasting non–European country.
  • Use and understand specific geographical vocabulary to human and physical geography.
  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.

 

 

  • Continuing to develop atlas work and consider the difficult journeys made by Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole.
  • Researching Jamaica and Grays.
  • Using and understanding basic geographical vocabulary relating to human and physical geography to compare different locations, including a contrasting non-European country.

 

 

 

Year 3

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • To revise locating and identifying the different continents on a world map.
  • To locate the main rivers in the UK
  • Settlements.
  • To develop their mapping skills.

 

Our local area-

  • Make observations about where things are e.g. within school or local area.
  • Express their own views about their environment, make appropriate observations about why things happen and analyse evidence.
  •    Field work - Draw simple features they   observe in their environment.
  • Use a prepared questionnaire to collect information.
  •    Begin to spatially match places (e.g. recognise UK on a small scale and larger scale map) Describe what places look like, where buildings are situated, how land is used.
  •   Identify the similarities and differences between places.

 

  • Human geography and the trade links in the pre-Roman and Roman era (links with our History topic).
  • The locations of the world’s volcanic and earthquake regions and study Pompeii.
  • The types of rocks where fossils are most prevalent (linking our learning back to our rocks and soils topic).

 

 

Year 4

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Through our topic of The United Kingdom, we will:

  • Name and locate countries and some counties of the UK.
  • Explore physical and human characteristics of the UK, including some cities, mountains, coasts and rivers.
  • Use an Atlas to locate countries, counties, mountains and to further develop their map skills.

 

Through our topics of France we will:

  • Begin to understand scale and distance on a map, using and applying mathematical skills.
  • Describe key aspects of human geography including types of settlement and land use, economic activities and the distributions of some natural resources of the country studied.
  • Understand the geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region in France.
  • Use a globe & maps & some OS symbols on maps to name geographical regions & identifying physical and human characteristics, including cities, rivers, mountains, hills, key topographical features, land-use patterns.
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied.

 

We will learn about the different types of landscapes in Africa.  We will focus on the desert, the savannah, the rivers, the highlands, the forests and wetlands.

  • Use a globe and maps, recognising some OS symbols on maps to name geographical regions to identifying physical and human characteristics, including cities, rivers, mountains, hills, key topographical features, land-use patterns.
  • Describe & understand key aspects of physical geography, including rivers and mountains.
  • Begin to understand scale and distance on a map, using and applying mathematical skills.
  • Describe key aspects of human geography including types of settlement and land use, economic activity and the distribution of some natural resources of the countries studied.
  • Name and locate the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle
  • Communicate geographical information in a variety of ways

 

 

 

Year 5

Autumn

Spring

Summer

We will be building on previous knowledge of the local area to develop our map skills and compare and contrast to local in the UK.

  • Naming and locating countries and cities in the UK.
  • Using a globe, maps & some OS symbols on maps to name and locate counties & cities of the UK.
  • Learning more about the geographical regions of the UK & their identifying physical and human characteristics, including more cities and detail of the key topographical features including naming some UK hills, mountains & rivers or types of coasts.
  • Giving a few reasons for the impact of geographical influences/ effects on people place or themes studied (job opportunities, tourism, housing).
  • Providing greater detail of geographical regions of the UK & their identifying physical and human characteristics.
  • Orienteering

 

We will be studying physical geography focusing on coasts and rivers.

  • Understand more about the geographical regions of the UK and their identifying physical and human characteristics, including more cities and detail of the key topographical features, including naming some UK hills, mountains and rivers or types of coast.
  • Provide greater detail of geographical regions of the UK and their identifying physical and human characteristics.
  • Demonstrate understanding of key aspects of physical geography, e.g. climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.
  • Explain the water cycle using a diagram.
  • Use precise geographical words when describing geographical places, features and processes, such as erosion, deposition, mouth, source, tributary, cliff, bay, headland, relief, resort, port, derelict, latitude, longitude, distribution, industry, network, region, raw material, energy, fuel, power, natural resource, labour.

 

We will be studying physical geography focusing on South America.

Identify some of the world’s countries, focusing on South America; concentrating on environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities.

  • Demonstrate understanding of geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the UK and a region within South America.
  • Justify and give some reasons for geographical similarities and differences between UK, European and North/South American regions.
  • Demonstrate understanding of key aspects of physical geography, e.g. climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.
  • Use precise geographical words when describing geographical places, features and processes, such as erosion, deposition, mouth, source, tributary, cliff, bay, headland, relief, resort, port, derelict, latitude, longitude, distribution, industry, network, region, raw material, energy, fuel, power, natural resource, labour.

 

Year 6

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Locate the world’s countries using maps, interpret a range of sources of geographical information including maps and globes.
  • Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human features of the world (trade links, climate zones etc)
  • Focus on North America- environmental regions, key physical and human (PSHE) characteristics, countries, states and major cities.
  • Introduce precise geographical words.
  • Identify the position/significance of latitude/longitude, the equator.
  • Describe and make links between places and features.
  • Create maps of locations and identify patterns.
  • Recognise the physical geography of mountains, coasts, volcanoes and earthquakes.
  • Use atlases to describe different features.
  • Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human features of the world.
  • Describe and make links between places and features.
  • Describe and understand key aspects of earthquakes, hurricanes and tsunamis.

 

  • Appreciate that aspects of the local area have changed.
  • Carry out an in-depth study of the local area, focusing on changes.
  • Using and understanding different geographical data.
  • Interpreting a range of geographical sources including maps, globes, aerial photographs and ordinance surveys. 
  • Know how population changed as a result of the war.
  • Realise the impact on houses and housing.
  • Recognise the city states of Athens and Sparta.

 

 

 

 

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