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It is with great determination that we strive to engender a lifelong love of reading and language through the immersion of stories and texts that interest, inspire and excite our children. We strive for children to read a variety of genres and use these as models for their own writing. The staff at St Thomas’ are committed to providing a reading culture and supporting children in developing good reading habits that will support them throughout their education, in their personal life and beyond. It is our vision that these exciting materials and opportunities will inspire our children to write.

Reading for pleasure is at the heart of all that we do and we have pupils that have developed the habit and passion for reading regularly and widely. The vast array of opportunities supports the children in becoming skilled in reading, but most importantly our children love nothing more than getting lost in the pages of a book. Early reading is high on our agenda and we recognise that the early years of a child’s life are crucial. The experiences that we offer the children in the EYFS and year 1 are fundamental in laying the foundations for future reading success. Reading interest is sparked in our children from day one and children have picture books to read initially, leading to phonic based books and on to more complex novels as they reach KS2. Class libraries, daily reading, initiatives to encourage regular reading and celebrations of authors are just some of the many experiences we provide for our children.

Reading

 

Reception

Autumn

Spring

Summer

In Phonics/Reading we will begin the Read Write Inc phonics scheme. The children will learn:

  • To read the twenty-six initial sounds.
  • To recognise their name.
  • To identify the initial sounds in words.
  • To recognise their own name and other familiar words such as advertising logos
  • To look at books independently.
  • To suggest how a story might end
  • To listen to and join in with stories and poems.
  • To anticipate key events and phrases in rhymes and stories.
  • To begin to be aware of how stories are structured.

 

 

In Phonics/Reading we will be learning:

  • To develop their phonic knowledge in line with the Read Write Inc scheme.
  • How to blend sounds together in order to read simple words.
  • To read short sentences.

 

  • About a range of text types and using them as an example for our own writing.
  • To write in sentences using capital letters and full stops.

 

 

 

Year 1

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Taking turns in a group reading session
  • Saying what we think characters are like by what they say and do
  • Discussing the title and talking about the events in the story
  • Recording information from non-fiction texts
  • Finding facts in non-fiction texts
  • Listening to and discussing a range of stories
  • Retelling stories in the correct order
  • Recalling the main events in a story
  • Identifying the main characters and saying what they are like
  • Predicting the next part of the story
  • Appreciating rhymes and poems
  • Asking questions before reading non-fiction books to find the answers
  • Answering questions at the end of a story
  • Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words
  • Reading common exception words
  • Recognising the title, author, and illustrator of a book
  • Linking what we read and hear read, to our own experiences
  • Using our imagination to re-enact stories
  • Reading words containing ‘s, es, ing, ed, er, est’ endings
  • Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge
  • Giving an opinion on what is read to us and listening to the opinions of others

 

  • Taking turns in a group reading session
  • Saying what we think characters are like by what they say and do
  • Discussing the title and talking about the events in the story
  • Recording information from non-fiction texts
  • Finding facts in non-fiction texts
  • Listening to and discussing a range of stories
  • Retelling stories in the correct order
  • Giving an opinion on what is read to us and listening to the opinions of others
  • Recalling the main events in a story
  • Identifying the main characters and saying what they are like
  • Predicting the next part of the story
  • Reading accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words
  • Re-reading books to build up fluency and confidence in word reading
  • Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words
  • Introducing the index and contents page in a non-fiction text
  • Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge
  • Know some simple structural features in a text (beginning, middle, end)
  • Recognise and join in with predictable phrases

 

  • Reading most words with the correct sound to graphemes for all 40+ phonemes, including alternatives
  • Reading words containing; s, es, ing, ed, er, est endings
  • Reading words with contractions such as I’ve, I’m, we’ll, understanding the apostrophe represents omitted letters
  • Read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound
  • Know some simple structural features in a text
  • Predict the next part of a story
  • Discuss meanings of new words and link these to words already known

 

 

Year 2

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Reading stories with a familiar setting, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
  • Predicting what may happen.
  • Retelling a story, using words from the text.
  • Recognising and discussing the features of different texts.
  • Reading words of two or more syllables.
  • Blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
  • Reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
  • Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge and background information.
  • Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words.
  • Reading Common Exception Words.
  • Using inference to draw simple conclusions about characters, settings and events.
  • Making simple inferences about characters from what they say and do.
  • Discussing favourite authors.
  • Answering questions by referring back to the text.
  • Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explain the meaning of words in context.
  • Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
  • Discussing story structure, settings and themes. Participating in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to others.
  • Phonics: applying phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words.
  • Recognising alternative spelling choices for the same sound. For example: the sound ‘a’ can be spelt in a variety of ways – say, rain, make, straight.
  • Reading words containing common prefixes and suffixes.

 

  • Reading a variety of stories, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
  • Predicting what may happen, based upon previous events.
  • Retelling a story, using key wording from the text.
  • Recognising and discussing the various features of different texts in detail.
  • Reading words of two or more syllables fluently.
  • Reading accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
  • Reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
  • Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge and background information.
  • Making links between the book that they are reading and other books that they have read.
  • Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words.
  • Reading Common Exception Words fluently.
  • Using inference to draw conclusions about characters, settings and events.
  • Making inferences about characters from what they say and do.
  • Discussing favourite authors and explaining preferences.
  • Answering questions by referring back to specific parts of the text.
  • Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explaining the meaning of a variety of words.
  • Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
  • Recognising the key features of non-chronological reports, stories and persuasive texts. For example: paragraphs, sub headings, different layouts and story language.
  • Reading, writing and changing stories, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas, apostrophes, adjectives, adverbs and exclamation marks.

Discussing story structure, settings and themes.

  • Reading stories with a familiar setting, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
  • Predicting what may happen, based upon specific clues in the text.
  • Retelling a story with confidence, using key words from the text.
  • Recognising and discussing the various features of different texts in detail and comparing these with other texts.
  • Reading words of two or more syllables with fluency and confidence.
  • Reading accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
  • Confidently reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
  • Making links between the book that they are reading and other books, discussing the similarities and differences.
  • Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode unfamiliar words.
  • Reading Common Exception Words with confidence and fluency.
  • Reading words accurately and fluently at 90 words per minute.
  • Using inference to draw conclusions about characters, settings and events.
  • Making inferences about characters from what they say and do.
  • Answering questions by referring back to key words in the text to support an answer.
  • Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explain the meaning of a variety of words in context.
  • Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
  • Reading, writing and changing stories, poems and chronological reports.
  • Reading with fluency, expression and confidence.
  • Discussing and clarifying the meaning of words.

Explaining and discussing their understanding of books, poems and other material.

 

Year 3

Autumn

Spring

Summer

This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’.

At this stage, word reading skills (including phonics) will continue to be taught, but the main focus will be helping children to understand what they are reading (comprehension). In comprehension children will be taught key skills to enable them to read and develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding what they have read.  We will, for example:

  • Read, listen, discuss and enjoy a wide range of fiction, poetry and non-fiction as a class and individually.
  • Use knowledge of root words to help identify new words.
  • Develop word knowledge to understand new vocabulary in context.
  • Ask questions to improve their understanding of a text.
  • Use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.
  • Record and retrieve information from non-fiction texts.
  • Draw inferences such as characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justify inferences with evidence.
  • Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
  • Prepare poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Explore themes and conventions in a range of books e.g. good versus evil
  • Consider the effect of the author’s choice of language
  • Offer opinions about what they have read and justify their views.

 

In Year 3, word reading skills (including phonics) will continue to be taught, but the main focus will be helping children to understand what they are reading (comprehension). In comprehension children will be taught key skills to enable them to read and develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding what they have read.  We will, for example:

  • Reading and discussing a range of fiction, poetry and non-fiction as a class and individually.
  • When retrieving information check that the text makes sense.
  • Discuss their understanding of the text.
  • Drawing and justifying inferences of characters feelings, thoughts and motives.
  • Justify inferences with evidence from the text.
  • Using expression, intonation and tone when reading writing.
  • Apply their growing knowledge of root words, suffixes and prefixes to read words aloud.
  • Try out different pronunciations when tackling longer words.
  • Increase familiarity of fairy stories, myths and legends and orally retell them.
  • Predict what might happen in the story.

Discuss words and phrases that might capture their interest and imagination.

  • Listen to and discuss a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays and non-fiction.
  • Read and discuss a range of fiction, poetry and non-fiction as a class and individually.
  •    Discussing how and why the author has written in a certain style.
  • Check that the text makes sense.
  • Discuss their understanding of the text.
  • Drawing and justifying inferences of characters feelings, thoughts and motives.
  • Justify inferences with evidence from the text.
  • Using expression, intonation and tone when reading writing.
  • Apply their growing knowledge of root words, suffixes and prefixes to read words aloud.
  • Try out different pronunciations when tackling longer words.
  • Increase familiarity of fairy stories, myths and legends and orally retell them.
  •    Identify themes and conventions in a range of books.
  • Predict what might happen from details implied.
  • Predict what might happen from details stated.
  •    Recognise some different forms of poetry.
  • Discuss words and phrases that might capture their interest and imagination.
  •   Participate in discussion about books read as a class.
  •   Participate in discussion about books read independently.

 

 

Year 4

Autumn

Spring

Summer

We will be looking at a variety of books and myths to help us explore our topic of ‘The UK’. We encourage a love of reading, both at home and at school and enjoy listening to stories and poems. We will continue on from the previous year to embed the following skills in our reading and comprehension lessons:

  • Retrieving information from the text.
  • Make inferences, giving evidence from the text to support their answer.
  • Use the context of the text and their word knowledge to understand new words.
  • Looking at the author’s language choices and what they mean.

The stories, myths and poems that we are reading will be used to create pieces of writing from a variety of genres. We will be looking at persuasive writing, narrative, diary entries and newspaper reports during the Autumn Term.

 

We will be looking at a variety of books to help us explore our topic of ‘France’. We encourage a love of reading, both at home and at school and enjoy listening to stories and poems. We will continue on from the previous term to embed the following skills in our reading and comprehension lessons:

  • Retrieving information from the text.
  • Make inferences, giving evidence from the text to support their answer.
  • Use the context of the text and their word knowledge to understand new words.
  • Looking at the author’s language choices and what they mean.

 

  • Identify the main idea of a text from more than one paragraph
  • Summarise their understanding of the main idea of more than one paragraph
  • Infer characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions
  • Justify inferences with evidence from the text
  • Predict what might happen from details implied
  • Discuss words and phrases that capture their interest and imagination.

 

 

Year 5

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Answer questions about the words and phrases used in a text.
  • Identify, describe and compare writers’ themes across a range of texts.
  • Read age appropriate books aloud with intonation, confidence and fluency.
  • Give/explain the meaning of new words.
  • Increase their familiarity with fiction genres including books form other cultures.
  • Use an understanding of morphology and etymology to aid them in reading unfamiliar words.
  • Check that the text makes sense to them.
  • Answer questions drawing on information from several places in the text.
  • Use evidence to both support and challenge conclusions drawn within and from a text.

Work out the meaning of words from the context.

  • Read age appropriate books aloud with intonation, confidence and fluency.
  • Give/explain the meaning of new words.
  • Increase their familiarity with fiction genres including books form other cultures.
  • Know a range of children’s authors and poets.
  • Summarise using an appropriate amount of detail as evidence.
  • Explain some choices an author has made in structuring and organising their text.
  • Predict what may happen using stated and implied details and a wider personal understanding of the World.
  • Answer questions about the words and phrases used in a text.

Identify, describe and compare writers’ themes across a range of texts.

  • Read age appropriate books aloud with intonation, confidence and fluency.
  • Give/explain the meaning of new words.
  • Increase their familiarity with fiction genres including books form other cultures.
  • Know a range of children’s authors and poets.
  • Recommend a book and explain why.
  • Retrieve information from non-fiction books.
  • Predict what may happen using stated and implied details and a wider personal understanding of the World.
  • Use pertinent and technically specific vocabulary when talking about books.

 

 

Year 6

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Reading ‘Locomotion’ and ‘Stay where you are and leave’ exploring the issues raised in the books through drama and writing.
  • Making cross-curricular links with our curriculum.
  • Reading aloud using a range of strategies.
  • Checking that text makes sense and asking questions to clarify understanding.
  • Empathising with characters in our reading.
  • Predicting what might happen from implied meanings.
  • Evaluating how authors use figurative language and the effects it creates.
  • Identifying and comparing themes used in poetry.
  • Role-playing scenarios from our books and performing poetry.
  • Creating freeze-frames to depict thoughts and feelings.
  • Trying out others’ ideas and giving helpful feedback.

Writing:

  • Writing for a range of purposes including poetry, letters, recount, biography, narrative, instructional and newspaper reports.
  • Describing characters and setting.
  • Using different layouts to organise writing.
  • Proof reading for spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.
  • Consolidating our use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and apostrophes.
  • Spelling homophones correctly.
  • Writing legibly and using letters of an appropriate size.
  • Beginning to use more advance punctuation such as parenthesis.

 

  • Reading ‘Floodland’ and using the text to explore the changes to our World.
  • Studying non-fiction texts and understanding their purpose.
  • Exploring characters and adopting their use of Standard and Non-standard language in role-play.
  • Making cross-curricular links with our curriculum.
  • Reading aloud with fluency and confidence.
  • Consolidating our understanding of complex texts and deciphering the meaning of words.

Explaining our understanding of the text by making references to what the writer has written.

  • Reading, ‘Goodnight Mr Tom’ and focusing on Greek myths and legends.
  • Reading aloud with fluency, intonation and expression.
  • Empathising with characters and identifying feelings.
  • Exploring different language used in Shakespeare plays.
  • Adopting the role of characters in role-play, understanding and empathising with their actions.
  • Explaining the significance of different words in the context of a text.

 

 

Writing 

Reception

Autumn

Spring

Summer

We will begin the Read Write Inc phonics scheme. The children will learn:

  • To write the twenty-six initial sounds and write them using the correct letter formation.
  • To write their name.
  • To identify the initial sounds in words.
  • To give meaning to marks as they draw and paint.
  • To ascribe meaning to marks that they see in different places.

 

  • To develop their phonic knowledge in line with the Read Write Inc scheme.
  • How to segment sounds together in order to write simple words.
  • To write a short sentence and labels.

 

  • About a range of text types and using them as an example for our own writing.
  • To write in sentences using capital letters and full stops.

 

 

Year 1

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Writing in standard English
  • Joining sentences using the conjunction ‘and’ to link ideas and sentences
  • Reading our writing out loud
  • Writing sentences using a capital letter at the start and  ending with a full stop
  • Writing lower case letters and capital letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place
  • Leaving spaces between words
  • Adding new words in our writing (adjectives)
  • Using a capital letter when writing the personal pronoun ‘I’, places and names
  • Adding ‘s’ and ‘es’ to form regular plurals correctly
  • Adding the suffixes –ed and –er to root words
  • Using our phonics to spell words accurately
  • Using exclamations in our sentences

Using a question mark at the end of a sentence

  • Writing in standard English
  • Joining sentences using conjunctions ‘but’ and ‘because’
  • Showing where the nouns are in sentences
  • Reading our writing aloud to check that it makes sense
  • Adding new words in our writing (adjectives and adverbs)
  • Using a capital letter when writing the personal pronoun ‘I’, names, places and the days of the week
  • Using our phonics to spell words correctly
  • Spelling the Year 1 common exception words and days of the week accurately
  • Dividing words into syllables to spell them
  • Write sentences in order to create short narratives and non-fiction texts
  • Spell many words containing previously taught phonemes and GPCs accurately
  • Adding the suffixes –s, -es, –ing to root words
  • Using exclamations and question marks at the end of a sentence

 

  • Writing a sequence of sentences to form a narrative and non-narrative text
  • Regularly using a capital letter for names, places, days of the week and the personal pronoun ‘I’, finger spaces and full stops to end sentences
  • Spelling common exception words and sounds from our Read, Write Inc band correctly
  • Spelling words with the suffixes –ed, -er, -est
  • Spelling words with the prefix un-
  • Joining words and sentences with ‘and, because, but’ and ‘so’
  • Use features of different text types and make appropriate topic/subject matter vocabulary choices
  • Knowing and using some simple structural features in a text
  • Discussing the meaning of new words
  • Spell most words containing previously taught phonemes and GPCs accurately
  • Spell most Year 1 common exception words and days of the week accurately
  • Using a question mark and exclamation mark

Spelling compound words

 

Year 2

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Writing simple, coherent narratives about those of others (real and fictional)
  • Writing about real events, recording these simply and clearly.
  • Demarcating most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required.
  • Using present and past tense mostly correctly.
  • Using co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
  • Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others.
  • Spelling some common exception words.
  • Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
  • Using spacing between words.
  • Learning how to consider what they are going to write before beginning; by planning, speaking aloud and writing down key words or ideas.
  • Writing stories, poems, instructions and recounts, whilst learning how to use full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks and question marks.
  • Using a variety of adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, sentence openers and verbs to engage the reader.
  • Recognising the key features of newspaper reports, instructions, stories and information texts. For example: columns, paragraphs, imperative verbs, story language and sub headings.
  • Handwriting: introducing joined handwriting, sentence writing, practising the use of capital letters, full stops and different ways of joining sentences by starting to use some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters.
  • Writing capital letters, lower case letters and digits of the correct size and orientation.

 

  • Writing coherent narratives about personal experiences.
  • Writing about real events, recording these simply and clearly.
  • Demarcating many sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required.
  • Using present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.
  • Regularly using co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
  • Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others •
  • Spell many common exception words.
  • Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
  • Using spacing between words.
  • Writing their own stories using this structure and building stamina through writing longer pieces.
  • Recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and patterns.
  • Making additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by re-reading to check it makes sense.
  • Using the correct grammatical terminology when discussing their writing through self and peer assessment.
  • Beginning to write in a joined style, using letters of the same size.
  • Phonics: learning spellings of common exception words.

 

  • Writing coherent narratives.
  • Writing about real events, recording these coherently and clearly.
  • Demarcating most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required
  • Using present and past tense correctly and consistently.
  • Regularly using a variety of co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
  • Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others.
  • Spell many common exception words and use these regularly.
  • Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
  • Using spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.
  • Writing their own entertaining texts by adding detail to interest the reader.
  • Ensuring that there is a clear, beginning, middle and end in their writing.
  • Writing non-narrative text types for a clear purpose.
  • Building writing stamina through writing longer pieces.
  • Using adventurous vocabulary.
  • Using apostrophes for possession.
  • Proof reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation and editing as required.
  • Self-assessing.
  • Adding suffixes to spell longer words, including -ment, -ness, -ful, -less, -ly.

Understanding and using contractions: can’t, didn’t, hasn’t, couldn’t, it’s, I’ll.

 

Year 3

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Composing sentences orally before writing
  • Creating settings, characters and plot
  • Organise paragraphs around a theme
  • Use simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings]
  • Assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggest improvements – edit and improve.
  • Propose changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences.
  • Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
  • Read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.
  • Use an increasing range of sentence structures.
  • Write sentences that include when, where and why something happens
  • To organise their writing into paragraphs around a theme
  • Check whether their work makes sense

Write for a range of purposes and genres.

  • Instructions
  • Recount
  • Shape poetry
  • Explanations
  • Letters
  • Stories with a familiar setting, focusing on character and mood.
  • Non-chronological report

In Grammar lessons we will work on:

  • Revisiting basic punctuation, (question marks, exclamation marks and apostrophe for possession).
  • Expressing time, place and cause using conjunctions [for example, when, before, after, while, so, because], adverbs [for example, then, next, soon, therefore], or prepositions [for example, before, after, during, in, because of]
  • Use of the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past [for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play]
  • Apostrophe for contraction

 

  • Begin to use ideas from own reading and modelled examples to plan writing.
  • Demonstrate an increasing understanding of purpose and audience.
  • Begin to use structure of a wider range of text types (use of simple layout devices in non-fiction).
  • Make deliberate ambitious word choices to add detail.
  • Begin to create settings, characters and plot in narratives.
  • Begin to organise writing into paragraphs around a theme.
  • Maintain the correct tense (including present perfect tense) throughout a piece of writing.

Write for a range of purposes and genres.

  • Poetry
  • Recount – Dairy entry
  • Explanations
  • Letters
  • Stories with a familiar setting, focusing on character and mood.
  • Non-chronological report

 

In Grammar lessons we will work on:

  • Use punctuation from previous years: inverted commas for speech, apostrophe for possession and contraction.
  • Use subordinate clauses.
  • Begin to use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to show time, place and cause.

Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ correctly most of the time.

  • Begin to use ideas from own reading and modelled examples to plan writing.
  • Demonstrate an increasing understanding of purpose and audience.
  • Begin to use structure of a wider range of text types (use of simple layout devices in non-fiction).
  • Make deliberate ambitious word choices to add detail.
  • Begin to create settings, characters and plot in narratives.
  • Begin to organise writing into paragraphs around a theme.
  • Maintain the correct tense (including present perfect tense) throughout a piece of writing.
  • Use punctuation from previous years: inverted commas for speech, apostrophe for possession and contraction.
  •    Placing the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals.
  • Use subordinate clauses.
  • Begin to use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to show time, place and cause.
  • Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ correctly most of the time.
  •    Proof-read theirs and others’ work to check for errors, suggesting and making          improvements.
  •    Make deliberate ambitious word choices to add detail, effect and to engage    the reader.
  • Maintain the correct tense throughout a piece of writing with accurate subject/verb agreement.
  • Use subordinate clauses (sometimes in varied positions).

Writing for a range of purposes:

  • Poetry
  • Stories with a familiar setting, focusing on character and mood.
  • Adventure and mystery stories

 

 

 

Year 4

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Use the following punctuation confidently:
  • Full stops
  • Capital letters
  • Question marks
  • Commas in a list
  • Inverted commas at the beginning and end of speech
  • Apostrophes for singular possession and contractions
  • Use of expanded noun phrases to describe characters and settings.
  • Use of a range of conjunctions.
  • Write narratives with a clear beginning, middle and end with a clear plot.
  • Organise writing into paragraphs around a theme.
  • Proofread and amend writing with growing confidence.
  • To use a joined handwriting style with letters of the correct size.

  We will begin to learn the following skills:

  • Use the full range of punctuation from previous year groups, including:
  • Commas after fronted adverbials
  • Exclamation marks
  • Commas and full stops used correctly within speech
  • Apostrophes for plural possession
  • Use Standard English verb inflections accurately, e.g. ‘we were’ rather than ‘we was’, ‘I did’ rather than ‘I done’.
  • Write with a range of simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • Use fronted adverbials, e.g. As quick as a flash, Last weekend; usually demarcated with commas.
  • Spell all words with prefixes and suffixes correctly, e.g. usually, poisonous, adoration.
  • Spell homophones correctly, e.g. which and witch.
  • Spell all of the Year 3 and 4 statutory spelling words correctly.

 

we will be looking at persuasive writing, non-chronological reports, narrative, poetry and diary entries using the following skills:

  • Use the following punctuation confidently:
  • Full stops
  • Capital letters
  • Question marks
  • Commas in a list
  • Inverted commas at the beginning and end of speech
  • Correct use of commas and full stops around speech
  • Apostrophes for singular possession and contractions
  • Planning and writing our own texts to suit a specific audience, which accurately reflects the purpose.
  • Using fronted adverbials and adverbial phrases correctly in our writing
  • Using subordinate clauses in a complex sentence.
  • Using commas to show subordinate clauses.
  • Using exciting and interesting words which suit the text type to engage our reader.
  • Writing a satisfying ending.
  • Proof reading for spelling, punctuation and grammar errors.
  • Writing consistently with neat, legible joined handwriting.
  • Writing expanded noun phrases by adding prepositional phrases to the determiner, noun and adjectives.
  • Spelling common homophones.
  • Understanding the difference between plural and possessive ‘s’.

 

  • Use the following punctuation confidently:
  • Inverted commas at the beginning and end of speech
  • Correct use of commas and full stops around speech
  • Apostrophes for singular possession and contractions
  • Commas after fronted adverbials
  • Using fronted adverbials and adverbial phrases correctly in our writing
  • Using subordinate clauses in a complex sentence.
  • Using commas to show subordinate clauses.
  • Create detailed settings, characters and plot in narratives to engage the reader and add atmosphere.
  • Consistently organise their writing into paragraphs around a theme to add cohesion and aid the reader.
  • Always maintain an accurate tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Using exciting and interesting words which suit the text type to engage our reader.
  • Writing a satisfying ending.
  • Proof reading for spelling, punctuation and grammar errors.
  • Writing consistently with neat, legible joined handwriting.
  • Spelling common homophones.
  • Use knowledge of word families to help with their spelling.

 

 

Year 5

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Experiencing a wide knowledge of text types to inform our writing.
  • Ensuring that content and style of writing accurately reflects the purpose.
  • Using paragraphs to organise ideas.
  • Building cohesion between paragraphs.
  • Building cohesion within a paragraph.
  • Continuing to increase the speed of handwriting by choosing the shape of the letter to use when given a choice and joining letters accurately in order to increase the volume of writing which can be produced in a single lesson.
  • Using vivid description.
  • Linking openings to closings.
  • Using apostrophes to show possession and omission.
  • Identifying and use relative pronouns.
  • Selecting the parts of my writing that need to be developed in detail.
  • Carefully selecting words to create effect.
  • Using commas to show subordinate clauses.
  • Selecting words to create effect.
  • Using a varied vocabulary to develop ideas.
  • Proof-reading writing for spelling, punctuation and grammar errors.
  • Considering verb forms to aid description.
  • Build an awareness of the reader.
  • Editing and improving written pieces.
  • Writing in Standard English avoiding colloquialisms.
  • Spelling words from the Year 5/6 word list; focusing on spellings words with prefixes and suffixes.
  • Experimenting with clause position in complex sentences.
  • Identifying and using modal verbs to suggest degrees of possibility.
  • Using a range of sentence types; simple, compound and complex.
  • Using high level punctuation accurately.

Punctuating speech.

  • Write for a range of purposes and audiences, confidently selecting structure and organisation.
  • Describe settings, characters and atmosphere to consciously engage the reader.
  • Use dialogue to convey a character and advance the action with increasing confidence.
  • Create paragraphs that are usually suitably linked.
  • Proofread work, assess the effectiveness of writing and make corrections and improvements.
  • To use the following punctuation correctly: commas to clarify meaning and avoid ambiguity, commas for parenthesis, brackets for parenthesis, dashes for parenthesis, correct speech punctuation.
  • Use a wider range of linking words/phrases between sentences and paragraphs to build cohesion including time and place adverbials.
  • Use relative clauses beginning with a relative pronoun (who, which, where, when, whose, that), e.g. Professor Scriffle, who was a famous inventor, had made a new discovery.

 

 

  • Comment on the effect that the writer’s context has on the meaning of a text.
  • Comment on a writer’s purpose and viewpoint.
  • Describe settings, characters and atmosphere with carefully chosen vocabulary to enhance mood, clarify meaning and create pace.
  • Use a wide range of linking words/phrases between sentences and paragraphs to build cohesion including time and place adverbials.
  • Use relative clauses beginning with a relative pronoun with confidence (who, which, where, when, whose, that, and omitted relative pronouns),
  • Use a range of adverbs and modal verbs to indicate degrees of possibility.

 

 

Year 6

Autumn

Spring

Summer

  • Writing for a range of purposes including poetry, letters, recount, biography, narrative, instructional and newspaper reports.
  • Describing characters and setting.
  • Using different layouts to organise writing.
  • Proof reading for spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.
  • Consolidating our use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and apostrophes.
  • Spelling homophones correctly.
  • Writing legibly and using letters of an appropriate size.
  • Beginning to use more advance punctuation such as parenthesis.

 

 

  • Using knowledge of text types, forms and styles to inform writing.
  • Planning and writing for a clear audience and purpose.
  • Developing thoughtful, lively and interesting writing through the use of openings and word choices.
  • Selecting the parts of writing that need to be developed in detail.
  • Using formal and informal structures and styles appropriate for the reader.
  • Affecting the emotions of the reader at points in the text.
  • Using speech to advance action and using reported speech accurately.
  • Proof reading writing for spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.
  • Using a range of devices for cohesion across a text.
  • Using punctuation consistently, especially to indicate speech.
  • Using more than one subordinate clause in a complex sentence.
  • Using semi- colons accurately.

 

  • Manipulating word order for effect and formality.
  • Varying sentence structure to expand ideas and provide emphasis.
  • Using speech to convey and develop a character.
  • Ensuring that the style and content of writing accurately reflects the purpose.
  • Using passive appropriately in writing.
  • Recognising and understanding the subjunctive.
  • Knowing how colons are used and using them correctly.
  • Using dashes to mark the boundaries between independent clauses.
  • Using hyphens in writing.

 

 

 

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