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Year 2

 

 

 

                                        WHAT WE WILL BE DOING AT SCHOOL THIS YEAR

 

Autumn term
An overview of the work being carried out by Year 2 in the Autumn term.
In line with Government expectation, we have implemented a recovery curriculum containing key elements of the Year 1 curriculum to be taught alongside Year 2 objectives.


Religious Education
In RE our topics are:
Beginnings
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Learn that Jesus was born and lived in a human family.
• Remember that God is present at every beginning.
• Explore new beginnings.
• Celebrate and respond to the many beginnings that each day offers.


Signs and Symbols
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Hear about the importance of symbols in the celebration of Baptism.
• Explore the signs and symbols they use and experience.


Preparing
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Understand Advent and how the four weeks help people to prepare to welcome Jesus at Christmas and the celebration of the birth of Jesus.
• Understand preparing to welcome a visitor shows love and care.


Judaism
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Understand why Saturday (Shabbat) is God’s special day for Jewish people.
• Understand how Shabbat is celebrated.
• Appreciate that Shabbat is a family day of rest, happiness and a time to think about God.


Hinduism
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Understand how Hindus pray at home.
• Explore quiet times and the Hindu home shrine.
• Appreciate the meaning of Puja as well as the purpose of the shrine.


English
In English we will be working on:
Reading
• Reading stories with a familiar setting, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
• Predicting what may happen.
• Retelling a story, using words from the text.
• Recognising and discussing the features of different texts.
• Reading words of two or more syllables.
• Blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
• Reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
• Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge and background information.
• Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words.
• Reading Common Exception Words.
• Using inference to draw simple conclusions about characters, settings and events.
• Making simple inferences about characters from what they say and do.
• Discussing favourite authors.
• Answering questions by referring back to the text.
• Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explain the meaning of words in context.
• Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
• Discussing story structure, settings and themes. Participating in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to others.
• Phonics: applying phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words.
• Recognising alternative spelling choices for the same sound. For example: the sound ‘a’ can be spelt in a variety of ways – say, rain, make, straight.
• Reading words containing common prefixes and suffixes.
• Taking turns in a group reading session (from Year 1)
• Saying what we think characters are like by what they say and do (from Year 1)
• Discussing the title and talking about the events in the story (from Year 1)
• Retelling stories in the correct order (from Year 1)
• Recalling the main events in a story (From Year 1)


Writing
• Writing simple, coherent narratives about those of others (real and fictional)
• Writing about real events, recording these simply and clearly.
• Demarcating most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required.
• Using present and past tense mostly correctly.
• Using co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
• Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others.
• Spelling some common exception words.
• Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
• Using spacing between words.
• Learning how to consider what they are going to write before beginning; by planning, speaking aloud and writing down key words or ideas.
• Writing stories, poems, instructions and recounts, whilst learning how to use full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks and question marks.
• Using a variety of adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, sentence openers and verbs to engage the reader.
• Recognising the key features of newspaper reports, instructions, stories and information texts. For example: columns, paragraphs, imperative verbs, story language and sub headings.
• Handwriting: introducing joined handwriting, sentence writing, practising the use of capital letters, full stops and different ways of joining sentences by starting to use some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters.
• Writing capital letters, lower case letters and digits of the correct size and orientation.
• Use adjectives and adverbs to describe (from Year 1)
• Write sentences in order to create short narratives. (from Year 1)
• Join sentences using the conjunction ‘and’ to link ideas and sentences. (from Year 1)
• Read our writing out loud. (from Year 1)
• Write sentences using a capital letter at the start and ending with a full stop. (from Year 1)
• Add new words in our writing (adjectives and adverbs). (from Year 1)
• Join sentences using conjunctions ‘but’ and ‘because’. (from Year 1)
• Read our writing aloud to check that it makes sense. (from Year 1)
• Use a capital letter when writing the personal pronoun ‘I’, names, places and the days of the week. (from Year 1)


Maths
We will be working on:
• Comparing and ordering numbers from 0-100.
• Using place value in a two-digit number to solve problems.
• Partitioning any two-digit number into different combinations of tens and ones, explaining their thinking verbally, in pictures or using apparatus.
• Adding and subtracting any 2 two-digit numbers using an efficient strategy, explaining methods verbally, in pictures or using apparatus (e.g. 48 + 35; 72 – 17).
• Recalling all number bonds to and within 10 and use these to reason with and calculate bonds to and within 20.
• Counting forwards and backwards in steps of 2, 3 and 5 from 0 and in 10s from any number.
• Recalling multiplication and division facts for 2, 5 and 10 and use them to solve simple problems, demonstrating an understanding of commutativity as necessary.
• Naming and describing properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes, including number of sides, vertices, edges, faces and lines of symmetry.
• Adding amounts of money and working out change.
• Numbers to 100 – reciting, reading, writing.
• Counting on/back in ones, twos and tens to 100.
• Recognising the place value of each digit in a 2-digit number.
• Appropriate standard units to measure length/ height (m/cm) in any direction; mass (kg/g); to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers and scales.
• The terms clockwise and anti-clockwise.
• To sometimes match numeral and quantity correctly (from Year 1)
• To understand, recognise and use money (from Year 1)
• Place the numbers in order to 20 and beyond (from Year 1)
• Compare and order using more than >, less than < (from Year 1)
• Counting and representing numbers to 20 and beyond (from Year 1)
• Counting on and back to 100 (from Year 1)
• Forming numbers correctly (from Year 1)
• Partitioning numbers into Tens and Ones (from Year 1)
• Addition and subtraction using numbers to 20 and beyond (from Year 1)
• Consolidating understanding of 2-digit numbers, representing these in different ways. (from Year 1)
• Revision of number facts and using these to solve additions and subtractions involving 1- and 2-digit numbers to 100 (from Year 1)
• Relating counting in 2s to doubling and halving (from Year 1)
• Forming numbers correctly (from Year 1)
• Saying the number one more or less and two more or less using a number line or a 100 grid, writing and saying 2-digit numbers and understanding them as some tens and some ones (from Year 1)
• Counting in 2s, 5s and 10s and identifying patterns (from Year 1)
• Understanding place value in two-digit numbers and then in relation to money (from Year 1)
• Using known number facts to add and subtract (from Year 1)
• Recalling number facts and using these to solve simple word problems (from Year 1)


Science
In Science we will be working on ‘Grouping and changing materials.’
The children will be learning to:
• Observe using simple equipment.
• Plan and perform simple tests.
• Discuss and evaluate the use of everyday materials.
• Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.
• Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.
• Identify naturally occurring materials.
• Predict and describe how materials can be changed and used and become familiar with the terms reversible and irreversible change.


Computing
The children will be learning to:
• Open and log onto the laptop/computer.
• Double click to open a program using the left mouse button.
• Recognise and name the parts of a computer.
• Recognise technology and how it is controlled.
• Design inventions.
• Use technology safely and respectfully.
• Understand the role of a computer.
• Program and adjust instructions.
• Begin to learn to touch type.
• Use a word processor.
• Add images to a text document.
• Create a poetry book using sources from the internet.
• Understand how to stay safe when talking to people online.


History
The children will be learning to:
• Use the words ‘past’ and ‘present.’
• Develop their sense of chronological order and consider why the great fire happened, its results and the different way it was represented using historical sources.
• Recognise that their own lives are different from the lives of people in the past.
• Identify aspects of the past beyond living memory.
• Ask and answer questions about significant events and individuals.
• Explore an event that has been commemorated for nearly 100 years.
• Investigate the origins of Remembrance Day and how its significance has grown.


Geography
The children will be learning to:
• Use maps and atlases to support their learning, identify and label the continents, oceans, countries, capital cities and the surrounding seas.
• Understand basic geographical specific vocabulary relating to human geography.
• Research famous landmarks and their locations.
• Explore the designs of these landmarks and their purpose.
• Discover the similarities and differences through studying human and physical features of the UK.


Design & Technology
The children will be learning to:
• Design a product using ideas and plan what to do next.
• Make a textile product by marking out, cutting and joining pieces of fabric.
• Look at a selection of hand puppets and base their design on their investigations into how the puppets have been made and who they have been designed for.
• Explain what went well during task.
• Explain what improvements could be made if the task were to be repeated.


Art
The children will be learning to:
• Sketch UK human and physical features using line and shading.
• Use drawing to share their ideas.
• Develop line, shape, form and space.
• Work from imagination.
• Work from direct observation.
• Draw using pencils.
• Create different tones using light and dark.
• Discuss my own work and that of other artists.
• Mix colours and predict outcomes.
• Make tints by adding white and tones by adding black.
• Create moods in my drawings.


PE: Dance:
The children will be learning to:
• Make and repeat short dance phrases that accurately express moods and feelings.
• Consider how to improve control.
• Use different parts of the body to show a sense of dynamic, expressive and rhythmic qualities in their own dance.
• Talk about different stimuli for the start of dance phrases.
• Choose appropriate movements for different dance ideas.
• Say what they like and dislike, giving reasons to support their opinions.


Music
The children will be learning to:
• Listen to a range of live and recorded music.
• Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using a variety of instruments.


PSHE
The children will be learning to:
• Develop their awareness of rules.
• Show kindness in different ways.
• Talk in front of peers and share feelings.
• Speak out to an adult if someone or something upsets me or somebody else.
• Say what they like about other people.
• Overcome problems with friends.
• Communicate our feelings about God’s treasures.
• Respect others’ personal space when working in a group.
• Use manners when speaking and listening to others.
• Be proud of my achievements during the term.
• Understand some of the things that keep our bodies healthy
• Make healthy choices.
• Recognise what they are good at and set simple goals.
• Recognise and manage our feelings.
• Cope with change or loss.
• Apply basic personal hygiene routines and understand why these are important.
• Become more independent.
• Correctly name the main parts of the body of boys and girls.
• Identify that household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used correctly.
• Follow rules that keep us safe (in familiar and unfamiliar situations).
• Ask for help if they are worried about something.
• Respect ours and others’ need for privacy in different contexts.

 

SPRING TERM
An overview of the work being carried out by Year 2 during the Spring term.
In line with Government expectation, we have implemented a recovery curriculum containing key elements of the Year 1 curriculum to be taught alongside Year 2 objectives.


Religious Education.
In RE, our topics are:
Books
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Explore about different books used at home and school and the books used on Sunday by the parish family.
• Study scripture and begin to understand that they are the treasured Word of God for the Jewish and Christian communities.
• Know about the books used by the Christian community to record and hand on its story.
• Study the lectionary, which is used at Mass and contains the scriptures used by the community throughout the year.
Thanksgiving
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Understand that the parish family gathers to give thanks to God, most of all for the gift of Jesus, his son.
• Know different ways to say thank you.
• Know that the word Eucharist which means ‘thanksgiving’. Eucharist is another name for the Mass.
• Understand that we give thanks to God for giving us Jesus in Holy Communion.


Opportunities
In this topic, the children will be learning to:
• Discover that the 40 days of Lent are an opportunity for Christians to turn towards what is good in preparation for Easter.
• Appreciate how each day offers opportunities for good.
• Think about ways to do good by prayer and by doing something extra to prepare for the celebration of Jesus’ Resurrection at Easter.


English
In English we will be working on:
Reading
• Reading a variety of stories, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
• Predicting what may happen, based upon previous events.
• Retelling a story, using key wording from the text.
• Recognising and discussing the various features of different texts in detail.
• Reading words of two or more syllables fluently.
• Reading accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
• Reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
• Developing an understanding by linking reading to prior knowledge and background information.
• Making links between the book that they are reading and other books that they have read.
• Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode words.
• Reading Common Exception Words fluently.
• Using inference to draw conclusions about characters, settings and events.
• Making inferences about characters from what they say and do.
• Discussing favourite authors and explaining preferences.
• Answering questions by referring back to specific parts of the text.
• Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explaining the meaning of a variety of words.
• Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
• Recognising the key features of non-chronological reports, stories and persuasive texts. For example: paragraphs, sub headings, different layouts and story language.
• Reading, writing and changing stories, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas, apostrophes, adjectives, adverbs and exclamation marks.
• Discussing story structure, settings and themes.
• Listening to and discussing a range of stories (From Year 1)
• Giving an opinion on what is read to us and listening to the opinions of others (From Year 1)
• Predicting the next part of the story (From Year 1)


Writing
• Writing coherent narratives about personal experiences.
• Writing about real events, recording these simply and clearly.
• Demarcating many sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required.
• Using present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.
• Regularly using co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
• Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others •
• Spell many common exception words.
• Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
• Using spacing between words.
• Writing their own stories using this structure and building stamina through writing longer pieces.
• Recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and patterns.
• Making additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by re-reading to check it makes sense.
• Using the correct grammatical terminology when discussing their writing through self and peer assessment.
• Beginning to write in a joined style, using letters of the same size.
• Phonics: learning spellings of common exception words.

Maths
In Maths we will be working on:
• Reading scales in divisions of ones, twos, fives and tens.
• Adding and subtracting any 2 two-digit numbers using an efficient strategy and with greater confidence, explaining methods verbally, in pictures or using apparatus (e.g. 48 + 35; 72 – 17).
• Using all number bonds to and within 10 to reason with and calculate bonds to and within 20, recognising other associated additive relationships (e.g. If 7 + 3 = 10, then 17 + 3 = 20; if 7 – 3 = 4, then 17 – 3 = 14; leading to if 14 + 3 = 17, then 3 + 14 = 17, 17 – 14 = 3 and 17 – 3 = 14).
• Recalling multiplication and division facts for 2, 5 and 10 and use them to solve problems, demonstrating an understanding of commutativity as necessary.
• Identifying 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/4, 3/4, of a number or shape and know that all parts must be equal parts of the whole.
• Using different coins to make the same amount.
• Reading the time on a clock to the nearest 15 minutes.
• Naming, describing and comparing the properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes, including number of sides, vertices, edges, faces and lines of symmetry.
• Working with numbers to 100 – reciting, reading and writing with greater accuracy.
• Counting on/back in ones, twos, threes, fives and tens and relating to times tables.
• Using < and >.
• Recalling and using addition and subtraction facts to 10, 20 and 100 fluently.
• Comparing, ordering, estimating and measuring volume, capacity and temperature.
• Combining amounts of money to make a particular value. (50p, £1.00, £2.00)
• Estimating and measuring length/ height (m/cm) in any direction, mass (kg/g) and capacity to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers and scales.
• Comparing and sequencing intervals of time.


Science
We will be working on:
Living things and their habitats including plants and animals in the local environment
The children will be learning to:
• Identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, knowing how they depend on each other.
• Identify and naming a variety of plants and animals in their habitats.
• Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, introducing the idea of a simple food chain.
• Identify and naming different food sources.

Computing
The children will be learning to:
• Explore a new application (Scratch)
• Create an animation.
• Use characters as buttons.
• Follow an algorithm.
• Plan and use coding to create an algorithm.
• Decompose a game to predict the algorithms that are used.
• Understand that computers can use algorithms to make predictions (machine learning).
• Understand what debugging is.


Geography
The children will be learning to:
• Name and locate 7 continents and five oceans, recognising where they are located in relation to one another.
• Use maps, atlases and globes to pinpoint these places on maps and in atlases.
• Use aerial photographs.
• Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and of a small area in a contrasting non–European country.
• Use and understand specific geographical vocabulary to human and physical geography.
• Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.
Art: Collage Matisse
The children will be learning to:
• Create individual and group collages.
• Use different kinds of materials and explain reasons for choice.
• Use repeated patterns in a collage.


Design & Technology: Winding mechanisms
The children will be learning to:
• Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.
• Research, design and build a winding mechanism to enhance and develop their D&T and team work skills.
• Use tools to assemble, join and combine materials.
• Talk about their own and others’ work.
• Suggest their own ideas for improvement and explain this in detail.


Music: Pulse, rhythm, pitch and pattern.
The children will be learning to:
• Listen with concentration and understanding to range of high quality live and recorded music.
• Create movement to accompany musical ideas.
• Perform simple repeated patterns and accompaniments keeping a steady pulse.
• Use symbols to represent sounds.


PE: Gymnastics:
The children will be learning to:
• Perform basic skills in travelling, being still, finding space and using it safely, both on the floor and using apparatus.
• Develop the range of their skills and actions, for example, balancing, taking off and landing, turning and rolling with control and coordination.
• Describe their own or their partner’s sequence accurately and choose an aspect to improve.
• Develop balance, agility and coordination.
• Turn on the floor and apparatus.
• Twist on the floor and apparatus.
• Understand how different movements can be linked together smoothly.
• Create, repeat and perform a short sequence.
• Vary their sequences using floor space and apparatus.
• Review one or more aspects of their performance to improve and explain how.


PSHE
The children will be learning to:
• Recognise how other people are feeling.
• Share their own feelings with others.
• Understand different types of behaviour and how this can make others feel.
• Explore the importance of not keeping secrets that make them feel uncomfortable, anxious or afraid.
• Share their views and opinions with others.
• Listen to others and playing cooperatively.
• Understand the importance of respect for differences and similarities between people.
• Explore special people in their lives.
• Recognise appropriate and inappropriate touch.
• Recognise that bodies and feelings can be hurt.
• Recognise that hurtful teasing and bullying is wrong.
• Know what to do if teasing and bullying is happening.

 

SUMMER TERM
WHAT WILL WE BE LEARNING AT SCHOOL?
An overview of some of the work being carried out by Year 2 during the Summer Term.
In line with Government expectation, we have implemented a recovery curriculum containing key elements of the Year 1 curriculum to be taught alongside Year 2 objectives


Religious Education.
In R.E. our topics are:
Spread the Word
The children will be learning to:
• Discover the importance of passing on messages.
• Understand about the Resurrection.
• Know that Jesus promises to send the Holy Spirit.
• Explore about prayer to the Holy Spirit.
• Understand about The Ascension.
• Know about Pentecost.
• Know that Christians pass on the Good News.
Rules
The children will be learning to:
• Read Jesus’ commandments to love one another and to forgive each other.
• Know about sin and the intention to commit sin.
• Study the examination of conscience
• Know about the Sacrament of Reconciliation
• Know about The Sign of Peace
Treasures
The children will be learning to:
• Explore the Creation story – Genesis.
• Explore the work of Cafod.
• Explore praise for the World.
• Explore the Gloria from Mass.


English
In English the children will be working on:
Reading
• Reading stories with a familiar setting, using expression and taking particular note of full stops, commas and question marks.
• Predicting what may happen, based upon specific clues in the text.
• Retelling a story with confidence, using key words from the text.
• Recognising and discussing the various features of different texts in detail and comparing these with other texts.
• Reading words of two or more syllables with fluency and confidence.
• Reading accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words, especially alternative graphemes.
• Confidently reading words containing: ‘s, ‘es, ‘ing, ‘ed, ‘er, ‘est endings.
• Making links between the book that they are reading and other books, discussing the similarities and differences.
• Applying phonic knowledge and skills to decode unfamiliar words.
• Reading Common Exception Words with confidence and fluency.
• Reading words accurately and fluently at 90 words per minute.
• Using inference to draw conclusions about characters, settings and events.
• Making inferences about characters from what they say and do.
• Answering questions by referring back to key words in the text to support an answer.
• Checking that they understand the text that they are reading and explain the meaning of a variety of words in context.
• Re-reading books to build up their fluency and confidence.
• Reading, writing and changing stories, poems and chronological reports.
• Reading with fluency, expression and confidence.
• Discussing and clarifying the meaning of words.
• Explaining and discussing their understanding of books, poems and other material.
• Reading most words with the correct sound to graphemes for all 40+ phonemes, including alternatives (From Year 1)
• Read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound (from Year 1)


Writing
• Writing coherent narratives.
• Writing about real events, recording these coherently and clearly.
• Demarcating most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required
• Using present and past tense correctly and consistently.
• Regularly using a variety of co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.
• Segmenting spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others.
• Spell many common exception words and use these regularly.
• Forming capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters.
• Using spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.
• Writing their own entertaining texts by adding detail to interest the reader.
• Ensuring that there is a clear, beginning, middle and end in their writing.
• Writing non-narrative text types for a clear purpose.
• Building writing stamina through writing longer pieces.
• Using adventurous vocabulary.
• Using apostrophes for possession.
• Proof reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation and editing as required.
• Self-assessing.
• Adding suffixes to spell longer words, including -ment, -ness, -ful, -less, -ly.
• Understanding and using contractions: can’t, didn’t, hasn’t, couldn’t, it’s, I’ll.


Maths
In Maths we will be working on:
• Read scales in divisions of ones, twos, fives and tens.
• Partition any two-digit number into different combinations of tens and ones, explaining their thinking verbally, in pictures or using apparatus.
• Add and subtract any 2 two-digit numbers using an efficient strategy, explaining methods verbally, in pictures or using apparatus (e.g. 48 + 35; 72 – 17).
• Recall multiplication and division facts for 2, 5 and 10 and use them to solve simple problems, demonstrating an understanding of commutativity as necessary.
• Identify 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/4, 3/4, of a number or shape and know that all parts must be equal parts of the whole.
• Use a variety of different coins to make the same amount.
• Read the time on a clock to the nearest 15 and then 5 minutes.
• Name and describe properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes, including number of sides, vertices, edges, faces and lines of symmetry. Compare the similarities and differences of shapes.
• Identifying, representing and estimating numbers using different representations, including on an empty number line.
• Using place value and number facts to solve problems.
• Applying knowledge of mental and written methods through addition and subtraction problems involving numbers, quantities and measures by using objects and pictures.
• Recognising the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and using this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.
• Choosing and using appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/ g).
• Recognising the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2.
• Working with numbers to 100 – reciting, reading and writing with greater accuracy.
• Counting on/back in ones, twos, threes, fives and tens and relating to times tables.
• Recalling and using addition and subtraction facts to 10, 20 and 100 fluently.
• Comparing, ordering, estimating and measuring volume, capacity and temperature.
• Combining amounts of money to make a particular value. (50p, £1.00, £2.00)
• Comparing and sequencing intervals of time.
• Recognise, find and name ½, ¼ of shapes, objects or quantities (from Year 1)
• Telling the time to the quarter hour from Year 1)
• Comparing and using uniform non-standard units to measure weight and capacity; information is recorded in block graphs for ease and clarity from Year 1)


Science
Animals, including humans
The children will be learning to:
• Explore and comparing the differences between things that are living, dead and things that have never been alive.
• Find out about and describing the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival.
• Discuss the importance for humans to exercise, understanding about eating the right amounts of different food types and hygiene.
• Use ‘Mrs Nerg’ – to help to recognise similarities and differences between animals and plants, and group them according to their characteristics.
• Know that animals (including humans) have offspring that grow into adults.
• Understand the importance of a healthy and balanced diet and lifestyle.


Plants
The children will be learning to:
• Complete growing investigations.
• Observe and describing how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
• Find out how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
• Record and measuring the growth of a plant.


Computing
The children will be learning to:
• Understand how computers can help humans survive in space
• Create a digital drawing of essential items for life in space
• Understand the role of sensors on the ISS
• Create an algorithm for growing a plant in space
• Interpret data.
• Understand what stop motion animation is.
• Plan a stop motion video, thinking about the characters I want to use.
• Create the beginning of my stop motion animation.
• Create a stop motion animation and include a second character.
• Watch and discuss our animations and come up with ideas for next steps.


History
The children will be learning to:
• Know about where the people and the events studied fit within a chronological framework and use words in relation to the passing of time.
• Understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past.
• Know why we remember Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole and will compare and contrast different ways of life.


Geography:
The children will be learning to:
• Use maps, atlases and a globe to locate the UK/its countries and other regions/countries/continents studied.
• Make a simple map and use basic compass directions.
• Use and constructing basic symbols in a key.


Art: Mother Nature
The children will be learning to:
• Use a range of tools for shaping and mark making.
• Replicate patterns and textures in 3D form by making a clay leaf.
• Explore shape and patterns in nature.
• Look within our local environment and exploring different textures and colours.
• Review what they and others have done and say what they think and feel about it.


Design and Technology
The children will be:
• Designing and making a healthy wrap and fruit salad.
• Generating ideas by drawing on their own and other people’s experiences.
• Selecting tools, materials and use the appropriate vocabulary to name and describe them.
• Using hand tools safely and appropriately.
• Evaluating against their design criteria.


PE
In PE our topics are:
Games:
The children will:
• Travel with, send and receive a ball and other equipment in different ways.
• Develop these skills to play simple, competitive net, striking/ fielding and invasion type games that they and others have made, using simple tactics for attacking and defending.
• Show good awareness of others in running, catching and avoiding games.
• Watch and describe performances accurately.
Athletics:
The children will:
• Show a good awareness of others in running, catching and avoiding games.
• Copy actions and ideas to improve their own performance.
• Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching.
• Be a team player.
• Push, throw and sprint.
• Develop sprinting skills.
• Throw from a distance.
• Jump with an even pace.
• Sports day skills.


Music: Exploring instruments, symbols and genres of music
The children will:
• Explore a variety of sounds.
• Identify a graduation in dynamics and tempo whilst listening to music.
• Respond to sounds and create improvisations.
• Perform simple repeated patterns.
• Order sounds to create a beginning, middle and end.
• Use symbols to represent their work.


PSHE
The children will learn:
• About group and class rules and why they are important.
• About respecting the needs of ourselves and others.
• About groups and communities that they belong to.
• About looking after the local environment.
• About where money comes from and what it is used for.
• About how to keep money safe.
• That everybody is unique.
• About the ways we are the same as other people.
• About the people who work in their community.
• How to get their help, including in an emergency.

 

 

 

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